Magnolia Science Academy is without a doubt a Gulen Managed charter school

The Gulen Movement is fantastic at advertising, PR, and bestwowing fake honors on their students, politicians, local media and academia. The Parents4Magnolia blog is NOT American parents it is members of the Gulen Movement in damage control mode. Magnolia Science Academy, Pacific Technology School and Bay Area Technology is the name of their California schools. They are under several Gulen NGOs: Pacifica Institute, Willow Education, Magnolia Educaiton Foundation, Accord Institute, Bay Area Cultural Connection. Hizmet aka Gulen Movement will shamelessly act like satisifed American parents or students. They will lie, cajole, manipulate, bribe, blackmail, threaten, intimidate to get their way which is to expand the Gulen charter schools. If this doesn't work they play victim and cry "islamophobia". Beware of the Gulen propagandists and Gulen owned media outlets. DISCLAIMER: if you find some videos are disabled this is the work of the Gulen censorship which has filed fake copyright infringement complaints to Utube



Saturday, December 24, 2016

LA County BOE Conditionally approves Magnolia Science Academy after 3 hours deliberation

It was the COUNTY of Santa Clara BOE that held Caprice Young and Magnolia Schools accountable.  Eventually the Magnolia Science Academy in Santa Clara closed they failed to meet many standards including a location.  Better the county overseeing than the State.

"The county’s Board of Education, which is now the authorizer of these charter schools, acted against the recommendation of the L.A. County Superintendent of Schools and her staff as well as LAUSD on Tuesday." 

"Overturning the superintendent and staff is not something that I take lightly, but here we had a situation where the admittedly serious fiscal problems were under resolution under (Magnolia Public Schools’ CEO and Superintendent) Caprice Young,”

"County staff recommended denying the petitions for a series of reasons, including “potential civil liability for the county board” as a result of Magnolia Public Schools’ “clear pattern of poor fiscal management” and a “pattern of failing to respond in a timely manner to its (previous) authorizer,” which was LAUSD."

"not all student subgroups at the schools have shown increases in academic achievement over the past two years, according to the L.A. County Office of Education staff. County staff also noted at Tuesday’s meeting that enrollment has been declining at the three schools and called the attrition rate of African-American students at the Magnolia Science Academy 3 in Carson “alarming.”

3 Magnolia charter schools facing closure ‘vindicated’ after winning appeal

A sign at the Magnolia Science Academy 2 campus in Van Nuys on Thursday, December 22, 2016.  (Photo by Dean Musgrove, Los AngelesDaily News/SCNG)
A sign at the Magnolia Science Academy 2 campus in Van Nuys on Thursday, December 22, 2016. (Photo by Dean Musgrove, Los AngelesDaily News/SCNG) 
A man rides his bicycle past Magnolia Science Academy 1in Reseda on Thursday, December 22, 2016.  (Photo by Dean Musgrove, Los AngelesDaily News/SCNG)
A man rides his bicycle past Magnolia Science Academy 1in Reseda on Thursday, December 22, 2016. (Photo by Dean Musgrove, Los AngelesDaily News/SCNG) 
Three Magnolia Public Schools, including two in the San Fernando Valley, were spared from potential closure after a county board voted this week to renew their charter school petitions on appeal.
The Los Angeles County Board of Education voted 4-1 Tuesday to renew the charters of Magnolia Science Academies 1, 2 and 3, located respectively in Reseda, the Lake Balboa area and Carson through June 2022. Two months ago, the Los Angeles Unified School District’s Board of Education denied their renewal. The three college preparatory schools, which are part of a network of 10 public charter schools in Southern California that emphasize math and science, serve about 1,400 sixth- through 12th-grade students in economically disadvantaged communities.
The county’s Board of Education, which is now the authorizer of these charter schools, acted against the recommendation of the L.A. County Superintendent of Schools and her staff as well as LAUSD on Tuesday.
“Overturning the superintendent and staff is not something that I take lightly, but here we had a situation where the admittedly serious fiscal problems were under resolution under (Magnolia Public Schools’ CEO and Superintendent) Caprice Young,” said Doug Boyd, president of the county board who voted in favor of renewal, on Thursday. “Since she got here in January 2015, we’ve seen major improvement in every single area questioned or the problem has been completely resolved.”
Boyd said he was impressed by the “very strong” academic performance of the schools’ students, including high graduation and college-readiness rates.
County staff recommended denying the petitions for a series of reasons, including “potential civil liability for the county board” as a result of Magnolia Public Schools’ “clear pattern of poor fiscal management” and a “pattern of failing to respond in a timely manner to its (previous) authorizer,” which was LAUSD.
In addition, not all student subgroups at the schools have shown increases in academic achievement over the past two years, according to the L.A. County Office of Education staff. County staff also noted at Tuesday’s meeting that enrollment has been declining at the three schools and called the attrition rate of African-American students at the Magnolia Science Academy 3 in Carson “alarming.”
In October, LAUSD’s Charter Schools Division cited the Magnolia schools’ “failure to timely respond” to document requests from LAUSD’s Office of Inspector General, which has been investigating Magnolia Public Schools since September 2014, and the Fiscal Crisis Management Assistance Team, an external state agency that provides financial oversight. District staffers said that Magnolia Public Schools’ “repeated failure” to respond in a reasonable time frame to information requests “limited the district’s ability to fully oversee the fiscal and business operations” of the nonprofit.
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Had the L.A. County Board of Education rejected renewal of the schools this week, the nonprofit charter school group could have appealed the decision to the state. The state appeal would have been its last recourse to avoid closure other than pursuing litigation, Young said.
“We were given a real opportunity to refute the misstatements and to add in the facts that were in our favor that had been left out, such as the fact that we have a near 100 percent graduation rate and our students graduate college ready,” Young said Thursday.
Each of the three schools has at least a 98 percent graduation rate and among the students who do graduate, more than 80 percent meet University of California and Cal State University eligibility requirements, according to the national nonprofit GreatSchools.org.
Young, a former LAUSD school board president, called the concerns of the county’s Office of Education and LAUSD staff “unfounded” but said the group will “continue to provide information to any oversight bodies and overseers that they request.”
The governing board of Magnolia Public Schools currently has three vacancies that it hopes to fill with community members, Young said.
The affected Magnolia schools in Reseda and Van Nuys were in the top 3 percent of all high schools in the nation, according to an April issue of U.S. News & World Report. The Magnolia school in the Lake Balboa area was also identified at the time as the top-ranked charter high school within LAUSD boundaries.
The government of Turkey has alleged that Magnolia Public Schools has inappropriate ties to a Turkish national Fethullah Gulen, who has been charged in absentia there for allegedly trying to destabilize the Turkish government. Young, who called Turkey’s allegation a “frivolous political vendetta” that has nothing to do with the local students, said the L.A. County Office of Education staff and its board “were smart enough” to realize that was not a real issue.
“We feel vindicated and just happy to be able to educate our kids,” Young said of Tuesday’s decision. “The county recognized that we’re doing a great job in collaboration with our families.”

MSA 1, 2, & 3 All Renewed by LACOE

Thank you MSA 3 Family! The holiday season is a little more bright with our recent news of the Los Angeles County Office of Education voting 4 to 1 to renew our school for five more years! 2017-2022 is solid and we say thank you for al of the parent, student, faculty/staff and the community. A big shout out to Carson City Council Juwane Hilton for speaking on our behalf! We are asking him to serve on our MPS Board! More details tomorrow but please visit our website for the updated academic calendar for the spring semester!

Gracias MSA 3 Familia! La temporada navideña es un poco más brillante con nuestras recientes noticias de la Oficina de Educación del Condado de Los Angeles votando 4 a 1 para renovar nuestra escuela por cinco años más! 2017-2022 es sólido y decimos gracias por todos los padres, estudiantes, profesores / personal y la comunidad. Un gran grito a Carson City Council Juwane Hilton para hablar en nuestro nombre! Le estamos pidiendo que sirva en nuestra Junta de MPS! Más detalles mañana, pero por favor visite nuestro sitio web para el calendario académico actualizado para el semestre de primavera!
Magnolia Science Academy 3 1254 E. Helmick St. Carson, CA 90746 USA 
THE SCHOOL THAT HAS AN  "Alarming" attrition rate of African American students.
http://us13.campaign-archive1.com/?u=0d77908cc700f77c0469ede0d&id=943704748a
A little-known county board overruled its own staff and the powerful Los Angeles Unified School District this week to allow three embattled charter schools to remain open.
The reprieve represents a full turnabout for Magnolia Public Schools, which faced the shutdown of its campuses after L.A. Unified moved against them in October. 
READ LA TIMES ARTICLE HERE LA TIMES MAGNOLIA

Sunday, December 11, 2016

The Bond Buyer mentions non renewal of Magnolia Science Academy impact ability to make bond payments

LOS ANGELES — The Los Angeles school board refused to renew three charters for Magnolia Schools, a charter school system that has faced financial problems and questions about connections to Turkey's coup.
More than 200 parents, students and teachers sporting yellow Magnolia shirts or blue Celerity shirts protested outside the school district headquarters Tuesday evening and filled an overflow room as they waited for the district's decision in a special meeting that dragged on for more than four hours.
Parents and teachers testified about the schools' academic achievements and about the one-on-one attention their children receive.
They also questioned whether LAUSD should oversee independent charter schools it competes with.
The board was weighing the future of six campuses involving three different charter systems that educate 13,000 students, and only one school avoided having its charter revoked.
The board stayed the revocation process for El Camino Real Charter High School in Woodland Hills, but only after its founding executive director, David Fehte, agreed to resign. The school has faced an investigation over the use of a school credit card.
The board denied the renewal of Magnolia's three charter schools and those for two Celerity Educational Group schools.
Board members appeared convinced by arguments from the district's Charter School Division that Celerity was operating too secretively by not turning over financial information and about an independent fiscal team's concerns regarding Magnolia's responsiveness to operational problems.
The board did not discuss an ongoing investigation by the district's inspector general into Magnolia's practice of hiring Turkish immigrants.
But Jerry Simmons, an attorney for Magnolia, said he was going to address the unmentioned elephant in the room regarding Magnolia and called the focus on the Turkish workers "discrimination based on nationality and religious beliefs."
"These people have never done anything, but provide a world-class education to inner-city kids in Los Angeles," Simmons said.
The vote against renewal impacted Magnolia Science Academies 1, 2 and 3. Magnolia operates 10 campuses, including eight located within LAUSD's borders. The three schools have 1,400 students enrolled of the 3,800 students taught by Magnolia.
Academy 1 in Reseda was built using $6 million in bonds issued through the California School Finance Authority in 2014. The bonds have a BB rating from S&P Global Ratings.
Caprice Young, Magnolia's chief executive officer, said the school board's decision will not impact Magnolia's ability to make bond payments.
She said Magnolia officials will appeal to the county and the state, a tactic it has used successfully before. It also won a lawsuit against LAUSD two years ago and has been operating under a settlement agreement with the district since then.
Young added that Magnolia has another school located three miles from the Reseda school that is not up for renewal.
If the school were forced to shutter before the 2017 school year, Magnolia would move the students into the nearby school, so the "kids would still have a place to go to school," Young said.
"We are virtually certain the county or the state will approve us if the district doesn't," Young said. "Can you imagine anyone closing a school that graduates 200 students from the highest poverty neighborhoods every year and sends them to top universities?"
Magnolia received scrutiny after the Turkish government accused it and some other U.S. charter schools of providing financial support to the failed July coup in Turkey. The schools' leaders denied involvement.
The charter school has faced criticism for years for hiring large numbers of Turkish nationals for teaching and other staff positions.
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has jailed and fired thousands of perceived enemies since the July coup and has ramped up efforts to use lobbyists and lawyers in the U.S. to go after perceived enemies here. Erdogan has claimed that his political rival, Fethullah Gulen, leader of a Turkish religious movement, who lives in Pennsylvania used money from U.S. charter schools controlled by his followers to support the coup.
In an interview prior to the meeting, Young said Magnolia Schools have no financial connection to Gulen's charter schools.
"Our teachers that come from Turkey are Muslim and some are admirers of Gulen's teachings and scholarship, and some are not," Young said.
Yet, the "president of Turkey has hired a multi-million dollar attorney and lobbyist to close our schools. It is unfathomable to me that someone thousands of miles away would care about the mostly Latinos from underserved neighborhoods we teach," she said.
At its highest point, Magnolia employed 97 Turkish immigrants as teachers, but currently employees 37, Young said. Magnolia has a staff of 350 teachers, deans and principals, so the 37 Turkish educators comprise about 10% of the staff, she said.
"We have not been doing any international hiring for the past several years with the exception of one Chinese teacher hired to teach Mandarin, who is employed in our San Diego school," Young said.
She explained that when Magnolia was founded over a decade ago one of its founders was Turkish. A number of the original teachers were University of California, Irvine and California Institute of Technology graduates from Turkey, who were college classmates.
New charter schools tend to ask existing teachers for referrals as well as advertising in educational publications when looking to add more teachers, she said of how the school ended up with a large concentration of Turkish teachers.
School board Member Ref Rodriguez, who said both Celerity schools are in his district, questioned whether it wasn't better for the board to work with the schools, rather than to not renew their charters, and have them end up being overseen by the state, rather than district, so board members have no control of schools located in their districts.
Rodriguez said that is already the case for two other charter schools in his district.
"I want to tell our charter partners out there that you've got to be good partners," said Rodriguez, who himself is a co-founder of a charter network. "You've got to look in the mirror and say, 'Are we being good?'
"But I also want the district's Charter Schools Division to ask themselves that same question," Rodriguez added, "because it takes two to tango. We need to be in a situation where we can get through some of these things because I don't want to see these schools in our backyard get authorized by someone else."
Rodriguez ended up voting with other members not to renew Celerity, though he abstained from voting on Magnolia, after hearing arguments from Charter School Division Director Jose Cole-Gutierrez about unsuccessful efforts by the district to work with Celerity and Magnolia.
Young contends that the report from the Charter School Division lists the financial problems Magnolia had before she took over in 2015 and doesn't take into account changes made since then.
"The state auditor's report gave us a clean bill of health in June 2016, because we had fully implemented all of the recommendations they provided," Young said.
The state determined that Magnolia needed an operational clean-up, not to be closed. LAUSD also tried to close MSA 6, 7 and 8 in 2014, but the courts ruled in Magnolia's favor.
Speakers raised questions about the inherent conflict in having LAUSD both compete with and oversee charter schools in its district. As LAUSD's traditional schools have seen enrollment decline, charter schools have experienced growth.
To make the decision more difficult, the charter schools reviewed during the special meeting are also attaining equivalent and sometimes better academic achievements than LAUSD's traditional schools.
LAUSD has the largest number of charter schools in the country in its district boundaries, said LAUSD Board Member Steve Zimmer.